Lost Sherpa of Happiness
Kelsay Books

Ken Craft’s second collection of poems features numerous meditations on man’s search for happiness. Divided into three sections, the poems focus on yin and yang harmonies of the world: coming-of-age and old age, the natural world and the manmade one, the gift of humor and the trials of hardship. With Buddhist, Taoist, and Christian undercurrents, these poems offer a variety of tones and styles that will entertain veteran poetry readers and newcomers to the genre alike.  

Ken Craft is a master of metaphor—spade-cast skies, open-windowed life, window screens whispering their meshed tongues, Swiss cheese’s negative space—with the originality of a bracing tonic that affords a worldly perspective that is engagingly transparent. Reminiscent of the best work of Thoreau, James Wright or Wendell Berry, Craft’s poems astutely sum up situations ranging from dying frogs to the way a Maine lake can be viewed by changing positions. A marriage of nature and philosophy, they are a delight to the imagination and the intellect.

- Joan Colby, author of Kithara Prize-winner, Ribcage

The Indifferent World
FutureCycle Press

A childhood home haunted by the past, a farm-animal veterinarian’s bloody operations in the field, an unemployed cousin stranded by time and hope—Ken Craft explores the indifferent world in all its manifestations. He chronicles the stories of others who have faced indifference with grace, too—the bus driver reading Irish literature for night school, the old Mainer preparing his homestead for winter, even Leo Tolstoy’s last dash from death, which caught up with him at a train station in Astapova. In turns contemplative, humorous, and quixotic, this debut collection is a quiet celebration of everyday life in our preoccupied world. 

A childhood home haunted by the past, a farm-animal veterinarian’s bloody operations in the field, an unemployed cousin stranded by time and hope—Ken Craft explores the indifferent world in all its manifestations. He chronicles the stories of others who have faced indifference with grace, too—the bus driver reading Irish literature for night school, the old Mainer preparing his homestead for winter, even Leo Tolstoy’s last dash from death, which caught up with him at a train station in Astapova. In turns contemplative, humorous, and quixotic, this debut collection is a quiet celebration of everyday life in our preoccupied world. 

- Paul Hostovsky, author of The Bad Guys and Selected Poems